Friday Product Post: RFID Tag Reader and Tags!

Our new Simultaneous RFID Reader brings multitag tracking capabilities to the masses.

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Finally, RFID for the People! (not just the RF engineers)

The SparkFun Simultaneous RFID Tag Reader puts multitag reading potential in your hands.

This breakout board features ThingMagic’s M6E Nano module, which is ideal for your small form-factor, portable reader design.

SparkFun Simultaneous RFID Reader - M6E Nano

SEN-14066
199.95
1

The Arduino shield footprint can connect directly to an Arduino-compatible board, the USB connection or an external power supply. There is an easy serial interface to read and write to tags using either US or EU frequency standards (FCC for US and ETSI for EU). Universal Reader Assistant software sets you up to read and program your tags. There is even a kill feature to disable the tags for security purposes.

The reader works with common, low-cost, passive Gen2 UHF tags. We offer two options of tags: one with adhesive backing and one without.

UHF RFID Tag - Adhesive (Set of 5)

WRL-14151
1.5

These paper-thin, adhesive EPCglobal Gen2 tags work with our Simultaneous RFID reader and can be stuck to practically anything you can imagine. Each tag comes with a TID (Truly Unique ID) that can’t be changed, but there’s plenty of memory for you to write and read from.

UHF RFID Tag (Set of 5)

WRL-14147
1.5

This EPCglobal Gen 2 tag is exactly the same as the adhesive tag — only not sticky.

You can use the trace antenna on the PCB, or solder jumpers can select between the PCB antenna and u.FL external antenna option for greater read range.

Check out our tutorials and resources for more info:

Think small, portable readers… and let us know what you build!

That’s it for this week, folks. We hope you have a great weekend, creating some great projects. Check back next Friday for more new products!


Comments 12 comments

  • I think you need to set this up at the next AVC it would be fun to play in between heats.

  • 27 milliwatts ain’t nothin' compared to the 1500W I can run as a Amateur Radio Operator ;)

    • I take my Technician Class test tomorrow, wish me luck!

      • Hey, Nick,

        Hope you passed! I first got my license back in ‘91. I’ve since upgraded to Extra. (My problems were with the Morse Code part – but that requirement no longer exists. I never got past 13 WPM.)

        BTW, I remember seeing that Limor “Lady Ada” Fried (founder of (Adafruit)[https://www.adafruit.com/]) got her license a few months ago.

        Also, 27 milliwatts is enough to communicate around the globe, assuming both ends have good antennas. (Some hams like to “push the envelope” on the low-power end. Those who actually use 1500W are demonstrating their lack of skill as an operator.)

      • If you know electronics and radio theory well enough, you might be able to pass all three in one go. My call sign is KM4HPK. You’ll pass at least tech.

  • I’m guessing the antenna comments should go with the RFID reader description, not the tags (I would be surprised but oddly pleased to find a u.FL connector on an RFID tag).

  • Seems to me you should have included a force sensor to detect who hit the antenna the hardest to serve as a “tie breaker”! ;-)

  • How far away could you pick up the tags with that antenna?

    • The board has adjustable power output from 0dBm to 27dBm, meaning that with the correct antenna you can read up to 16 feet (4.9m), or 1 to 2 feet with the onboard antenna.

      • I once wanted to use RFID for drone racing. Now with this setup with the high gain antenna it’s possible. Right now we have a new system that detect the strength of the video feed from the drone itself. Each pilot have their own video frequency so the base station check the “RSSI” of each flying drone passing by. It can then measure laps. All that with no extra gear on the drone. Before that we had IR beacons.

      • Which antenna is needed to read up to 16 feet?

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